A pair of alumni from MS Environmental Policy and Sustainability Management at Milano School of Policy, Management, and Environment have made influencer lists for their work in the environmental policy sphere.

Taylor Morton, EPSM ’17, (pictured left) was listed as one of the North American Association for Environmental Education’s 30 under 30, while Molly Craft Johnson, EPSM ‘15, and assistant director for sustainability initiatives at The New School’s Tishman Environment and Design Center (pictured right), was named as one of seven “Women ‘Killin It’ in the Fight Against Climate Change” by the University Network.

An environmental consultant and contractor for WE ACT for Environmental Justice, Morton is responsible for creating curricula and facilitating programming related to environmental health, equity, and environmental justice.

Her propensity for environmental education is “rooted in her family’s experiences as descendants of sharecroppers in Georgia,” Morton says. “I believe that the best way to honor my family and my ancestors is to be an advocate for an equitable environment for all people.”

Throughout her career, Morton has advocated for a healthy environment through education-related initiatives. In addition to her role as an environmental consultant, she teaches middle school science as a fellow at the University of Pennsylvania Independent School Teaching Residency Program.

In her role at The New School, Johnson is responsible for engaging students and supporting initiatives that bolster a campus-wide culture of sustainability. Prior to working at the Tishman Center, she was an Environmental Defense Fund Climate Corps Fellow at Dartmouth College, where she contributed to the College’s new sustainability plan, and interned with the Lower East Side Ecology Center’s EcoBizNYC program and the Environmental Justice team at the Natural Resources Defense Council in Santa Monica, California.

“I use the lessons I learned in the EPSM program to engage The New School’s 14,000 students, faculty, and staff in reflection, dialogue, and action that champions environmental justice above simple ‘eco-friendliness,’” Johnson told the University Network.

This post originally appeared on blogs.newschool.edu/news